STYLE


Uncovering fashion must-haves and latest beauty trends, each style section examines the many facets of fashion, and delves into the world of extravagance with luxury retail and lifestyle trends, styles on the red carpet and more.


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Behind the Scenes: Fashion Shoot

To create a summer fashion spread when the weather in Singapore is so erratic and unpredictable is a challenge. See what the team has to go through to showcase the latest summer threads in this issue of Sands Style.

     

Omega

In 1957, Omega created the Seamaster, Railmaster and Speedmaster with three professionals in mind. The Seamaster was made for the sea-faring individuals, the Railmaster for the train crew and the Speedmaster for the race car drivers.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the legendary trio. And it’s only natural for Omega to want to pay homage to the original creations as faithfully as possible. But, as always, watchmaking involves a complex balance of aesthetics and innovation. The watches have each changed drastically since 1957, especially in terms of their internal mechanics. But to preserve the brand's design heritage, it was still important to stay true to the aesthetics of the originals, down to the nearest millimeter. To that end, Omega employed a distinctly 21st-century technology called tomography, which is somewhat related to the X-rays that we're so familiar with. Over 3000 images are taken of the original, and a virtual 3D model is reconstructed using computer software so that each watch can be examined from every single angle, both inside and outside.

Each watch was faithfully constructed in appearance to the 1957 originals, but with internal workings from the modern day. The Seamaster Trilogy, for instance, retains the original's bidirectional black aluminium bezel, Naïad sign on the crown, and recessed hour markers.  Omega even goes as far as producing the watch faces to look like “tropical” dials. (Tropical dials give the retro look and come with a patina.) 

In 1957, Omega created the Seamaster, Railmaster and Speedmaster with three professionals in mind. The Seamaster was made for the sea-faring individuals, the Railmaster for the train crew and the Speedmaster for the race car drivers.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the legendary trio. And it’s only natural for Omega to want to pay homage to the original creations as faithfully as possible. But, as always, watchmaking involves a complex balance of aesthetics and innovation. The watches have each changed drastically since 1957, especially in terms of their internal mechanics. But to preserve the brand's design heritage, it was still important to stay true to the aesthetics of the originals, down to the nearest millimeter. To that end, Omega employed a distinctly 21st-century technology called tomography, which is somewhat related to the X-rays that we're so familiar with. Over 3000 images are taken of the original, and a virtual 3D model is reconstructed using computer software so that each watch can be examined from every single angle, both inside and outside.

Each watch was faithfully constructed in appearance to the 1957 originals, but with internal workings from the modern day. The Seamaster Trilogy, for instance, retains the original's bidirectional black aluminium bezel, Naïad sign on the crown, and recessed hour markers.  Omega even goes as far as producing the watch faces to look like “tropical” dials. (Tropical dials give the retro look and come with a patina.) 

> Read more about the Omega Trilogy in the latest issue of Sands Style, here


     

MIUMIU

With a bond so close they may well be sisters, actresses Emma Greenwell and Millie Brady spent a carefree holiday on the Amalfi coast of Italy being directed by British photographer Victoria Hely-Hutchinson in a short film for the launch of Miu Miu’s Scenique sunglasses. Witness the carefree, unfiltered moments that pass between the two girls – a boat ride, a game of hide and seek – in this video.
 

Click here to view more Style from the Spring 2017 issue>

 

 

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